Adjective "Unmotivated" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ʌnˈməʊtɪveɪtɪd/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Not having interest in or enthusiasm for something, especially work or study.
  1. 'It was an hour long comedy/drama about a smart, disaffected, sarcastic girl in her early twenties who had graduated from Brown University and, completely unmotivated, worked in a gift shop at Niagara Falls.'
  2. 'She talked about the despair of older generations of Americans that young people in America today don't vote because they're uninterested, unmotivated, and even just plain dumb.'
  3. 'The scale included items such as ‘think about how passive and unmotivated you feel’ and ‘go away by yourself and think about why you feel this way.’'
  4. 'To me. this Rangers team looks poorly organised, one-paced and unmotivated.'
  5. 'The good students are very good… but the tail of uninterested, unmotivated or simply not very bright students is very large’.'
  6. 'For instance clinically depressed people are very lethargic and unmotivated; further sedation can therefore be counterproductive, and massage is only carried out with the approval of the patient's counsellor.'
  7. 'Apathetic patients become unmotivated and uninterested in their surroundings.'
  8. 'Gen Xers were considered unmotivated, apathetic and cynical.'
  9. '‘The mood is very lethargic and everyone is unmotivated,’ according to an anonymous staffer quoted by the Irish Times.'
  10. 'This isn't just a simple act of vengeance - it's an expression of rage directed against an uncaring world and an extreme reaction to their pointless and unmotivated lives.'
Without a reason or motive.
  1. 'To no apparent end they go straight ahead, engaging in haphazard, unmotivated acts that defy society's rules.'
  2. 'It is futile to demand motivation from the Vice, or reasons for his actions, for the point about evil is that it is absurd, unmotivated, and inconsistent.'
  3. 'But the moral assessment of persons with respect to their ‘sexuality’ that is so ubiquitous in the modern world would have seemed to the ancient Greeks peculiar, arbitrary, and unmotivated.'
  4. 'Riots do tend to be woefully imprecise, but they are generally not random or unmotivated.'

Definitions

1. to provide with a motive, or a cause or reason to act; incite; impel.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be unmotivated."

"youths can be unmotivated."

"teams can be unmotivated."

"students can be unmotivated."

"prominences can be unmotivated."

More examples++

Origin

(motivate)