Adjective "Uncooperative" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ʌnkəʊˈɒp(ə)rətɪv/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Unwilling to help others or do what they ask.
  1. 'the authorities were inclined to be uncooperative'
  2. 'The manager suddenly became uncooperative and asked them to leave the premises.'
  3. 'He has been uncooperative, unhelpful, and particularly rude to teaching staff.'
  4. 'Measuring temperature in children can be difficult, especially when they are uncooperative or restless.'
  5. 'Was the problem really that the candidate was stubborn and uncooperative?'
  6. 'The problem is with the pollsters' inability to account for an increasingly uncooperative public.'
  7. 'This would be difficult if the host state were being uncooperative.'
  8. 'But what worries me is that he is still uncooperative, demanding and verbally aggressive.'
  9. 'He had poor eye contact and was generally uncooperative and unwilling to be interviewed.'
  10. 'He said uncooperative building management and poor law enforcement were the main factors causing poor safety standards to continue.'
  11. 'The court was told that defendant had been totally uncooperative in telling who his accomplices were or where the stolen property was.'

Definitions

1. working or acting together willingly for a common purpose or benefit.

2. demonstrating a willingness to cooperate: The librarian was cooperative in helping us find the book.

3. pertaining to economic cooperation: a cooperative business.

4. involving or denoting an educational program comprising both classroom study and on-the-job or technical training, especially in colleges and universities. noun

5. a jointly owned enterprise engaging in the production or distributio

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be uncooperative in courts."

"cattles can be uncooperative in herds."

"people can be uncooperative."

"witnesses can be uncooperative."

"horses can be uncooperative."

More examples++

Origin

(cooperative)