Adjective "Succulent" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈsʌkjʊl(ə)nt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of food) tender, juicy, and tasty.
  1. 'He removes a circle from the middle, replaces it with crisp endive, then uses it as a lid over succulent slices of rabbit, stuffed with mushroom duxelles and its own kidney.'
  2. 'Three-flavour chicken with rice and vegetables is a good choice, as is the sweet, succulent pork BBQ, also served with a healthy portion of fresh veggies.'
  3. 'Lili's salad, by contrast, was delicious: the slivers of chicken tender and tasty, and perfectly complemented by the succulent slices of mango.'
  4. 'The food in Jerez in southern Spain is unforgettable: succulent seafood and delicious ham from black-trottered, acorn-eating pigs.'
  5. 'There were sizzling sausages, succulent bacon and delicious free-range eggs, but they were placed on English muffins and drizzled with a light béchamel sauce.'
  6. 'It was really good, a perfect mix of flavors to accompany the succulent meat.'
  7. 'The pork was deliciously succulent and tender with a great flavour being imparted from the meat's fat.'
  8. 'The seafood primi are tasty, and the walnut cake is positively succulent.'
  9. 'The wait for ribs and sliced pork yielded heaping plates of succulent meat dripping in sauce and accompanied by chunky homemade potato salad and hot, crispy fried okra.'
  10. 'The succulent pork was moist and full of smoke flavor.'
(of a plant, especially a xerophyte) having thick fleshy leaves or stems adapted to storing water.
  1. 'a low plant with slightly succulent leaves'
  2. 'The plant is succulent with leaves in tight rosettes more or less four centimetres or more across in diameter.'
  3. 'Sporting thin, jagged leaves upon a succulent, fleshy stem, the herb is easily uprooted and replanted due to its shallow root system.'

noun

A succulent plant.
  1. 'Although a difference in water content between the different-aged leaves was not always observed in well-watered plants of two species of succulents, it was more commonly observed in plants under drought-stress.'
  2. 'To the left of the house as you face it the wall is quite high and full of planting pockets for rock garden plants and succulents.'
  3. 'Indeed, Mediterranean plants and succulents like agaves work splendidly in coastal and desert plantings.'
  4. 'Small specimens of cactus and succulents are ideal for these tabletop gardens, and many plants can coexist happily in the same container.'
  5. 'He mixes succulents with plants that have foliage of an entirely different nature, such as asparagus fern, coleus, or curly parsley.'
  6. 'Colourful and vibrant, the exhibition will have on display indoor and outdoor plants, water plants, exotic and aromatic plants, medicinal herbs, fruit and ornamental plants, cacti, and succulents.'
  7. 'The well-known garden designer and author will also conduct clinics to offer visitors the information and care advice they need to help with all kinds of plants, but particularly succulents as mentioned in his latest book.'
  8. 'Analysis of growth-form composition also reveals a high percentage of succulents and a low abundance of geophytes and annuals.'
  9. 'Prickly pear cacti and large agave succulents, introduced from Mexico, grow everywhere in the north of the island.'
  10. 'In sunnier, drier areas (often in their own micro-climates just a few miles away on the leeward side of the island) they plant succulents and even cacti.'

Definitions

1. full of juice; juicy.

2. rich in desirable qualities.

3. affording mental nourishment.

4. (of a plant) having fleshy and juicy tissues. noun

5. a succulent plant, as a sedum or cactus.

More examples(as adjective)

"societies can be succulent."

"prawns can be succulent."

"fruits can be succulent."

"fleshs can be succulent."

"vegetations can be succulent."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin succulentus, from succus ‘juice’.