Adjective "Staid" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/steɪd/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Sedate, respectable, and unadventurous.
  1. 'Remember, the stag do is still a deeply symbolic chance for the groom to let his hair down, so don't make it too staid.'
  2. 'In those days the staid, solitary Christmas tree on The Mound with its handful of lights was the highlight of my year.'
  3. 'This site will no doubt be jarring to the casual observer more familiar with staid academic websites.'
  4. 'It was his loud argyle socks that revealed the boyish sense of humour behind the staid visage.'
  5. 'Every comic had a point of view and everyone avoided staid old routines based on set-piece jokes.'
  6. 'Now, they're just staid old men and women in freshly pressed casual suits and middle management voices.'
  7. 'It is a slick piece of work, more like a product of Madison Avenue than staid Capitol Hill.'
  8. 'I was expecting a slightly staid, old-fashioned choir, with little of real interest.'
  9. 'Yorkshire food is traditionally seen as staid and stodgy, but can be modern and exciting.'
  10. 'The normally staid company has become a lot more adventurous of late.'

Definitions

1. of settled or sedate character; not flighty or capricious.

2. fixed, settled, or permanent. verb

3. Archaic. a simple past tense and past participle of stay1 .

More examples(as adjective)

"conservatives can be staid."

"people can be staid."

"images can be staid."

"worlds can be staid."

"markets can be staid."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: archaic past participle of stay.