Adjective "Sober" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈsəʊbə/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Not affected by alcohol; not drunk.
  1. 'I laid in bed last night, totally sober, praying for alcohol to fall out of the sky and into my mouth.'
  2. 'It was a pretty good night, even if, towards the end, I (being one of the more sober people there) had to nurse a few people who had drunk a little more than they should have.'
  3. 'Two, Sadie's a drunk and not a very good singer, sober or otherwise.'
  4. 'You must be relatively sober or they'll discount the act as drunken foolishness.'
  5. 'People recognize me more when they're drunk than when they're sober.'
  6. 'If you didn't know me, you'd think I was completely sober.'
  7. 'Much alcohol was consumed, yet I have a ridiculously high alcohol tolerance so remained very sober.'
  8. 'I got my bearings reasonably quickly, though, despite spending more time drunk than sober in the city centre.'
  9. 'I'm worryingly sober, despite a rather copious amount of alcohol consumed.'
  10. 'Drunk or sober, he was driven by a manic energy and impatience that made him a difficult friend and an almost impossible husband and father.'
Serious, sensible, and solemn.
  1. 'his expression became sober'
  2. 'She's very serious and very sober and as an actor she has a lot of technique and understanding of what's she doing.'
  3. 'Only that kind of serious, sober, independent reporting can give the public the insights into American business it now knows it needs to learn.'
  4. 'His expression was perfectly sober, and he didn't sound anything but serious.'
  5. 'With slow tempos predominating, they are sober, even solemn works, but hardly funereal, and never monotonous.'
  6. 'For this he needs courage above all, and a sober, clearheaded approach to sport, to his own fame and that of others.'
  7. 'Policies have to be reformulated and alliances rebuilt in a serious, transparent and sober manner.'
  8. 'As long as they had known Ian, they had seen him cheerful and smiling - perhaps quiet or sober during serious moments, but always ready with a smile.'
  9. 'That brought everyone back into a serious and sober mood.'
  10. 'The coverage was serious, it was sober, it was comprehensive, and the press really seemed in tune with the surge of patriotism in the country.'
  11. 'Thanks for your sober and clearheaded assessment of the situation and its significance.'
  12. 'Others marked the occasion with sober suits and black ties.'
  13. 'In a sober dark trouser suit and sensible walking shoes, she ticks the names off the electoral list on her clipboard.'
  14. 'The uniforms may have been replaced by sober suits, but the buzzcuts and the brightly polished shoes remained.'
  15. 'Fabrics embellished with elegant cuts, graceful falls and rich hues to gracious and sober tones are those best suited for the special occasions.'
  16. 'We go into meetings and there's me in a sober business suit, and Sarah, apologising for her outrageous T-shirt.'
  17. 'Observing the industrious lads is a 50-ish man in a sober wool suit.'
  18. 'The nominee was in a sober suit with the expected white shirt and red tie.'
  19. 'A sober brick building, unpretentious in scale and design, lies modestly low among lawns at the end of a road with playing fields on either side.'
  20. 'Trouser suits and sober colours probably describe me best.'
  21. 'The sober dark suits and flowing robes of 34 ministers and their minders have long since left for the airport.'

verb

Make or become sober after drinking alcohol.
  1. no object 'I ought to sober up a bit'
  2. 'They were lodged in cells, allowed to sober up, issued public intoxication tags and driven back to their residence.'
  3. 'One particular Monday morning his mates grabbed him and, after tying him to one of the sails, took him up to the top, a height of 100 ft, and left him there to sober up.'
  4. 'I began to sober down a bit and the world wasn't spinning.'
  5. 'Many players had to sober up from a night in the French Quarter.'
  6. 'David defended himself, hearing the pathetic tone himself, now that he was beginning to sober up.'
  7. 'He was left in a cell to sober up, released Saturday morning and three hours later was arrested again with an alcohol level that usually causes loss of bladder control and unconsciousness.'
  8. 'It is entirely acceptable to have a lie-down in the afternoon to sober up after lunch and prepare for more drinking at dinner.'
  9. 'And that, as I start to sober up and think it might be a good idea to get to bed before I start to regret writing this and delete it before posting, is probably my point.'
  10. 'Two doormen rush in to carry him out and he is duly removed, embarrassed and ashamed, left to sober up on the pavements outside the bar.'
  11. 'You'd have to wait till you sober up to drive OR wait for someone to drive you!'
  12. 'a sobering thought'
  13. 'She giggled at that, and then sobered when she saw he was serious.'
  14. 'The commander's approach was sufficient to sober down the concerned group, which quickly waved the white flag.'
  15. 'The play sobers up and offers serious moments, such as the anecdote of the Cuban immigrant's terrifying raft trip to the United States, leaving no doubt that beyond the humor there is a deep pool of thought and feeling.'
  16. 'But it's still sobering reminder of the perils of war.'
  17. 'His expression sobered a little, but he was still amused I could tell.'
  18. 'Jade quickly sobered as she noticed his continued lack of expression.'
  19. 'However, a few more sobering facts may change your opinion.'
  20. 'I laughed before sobering up quickly again and faced her with a solemn expression.'
  21. 'She looked up to see his grim expression and immediately sobered.'

Definitions

1. not intoxicated or drunk.

2. habitually temperate, especially in the use of liquor.

3. quiet or sedate in demeanor, as persons.

4. marked by seriousness, gravity, solemnity, etc., as of demeanor, speech, etc.: a sober occasion.

5. subdued in tone, as color; not colorful or showy, as clothes.

6. free from excess, extravagance, or exaggeration: sober facts.

7. showing self-control: sober restraint.

8. sane or rational: a sober solution to the probl

More examples(as adjective)

"tradings can be sober in/at/on days."

"people can be sober in instants."

"people can be sober for days."

"people can be sober for couples."

"people can be sober by nows."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English: from Old French sobre, from Latin sobrius.

Phrase

(as) sober as a judge