Adjective "Slivered" definition and examples

(Slivered may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈslɪvə//ˈslʌɪvə/

Definitions and examples

noun

A small, thin, narrow piece of something cut or split off a larger piece.
  1. figurative 'there was a sliver of light under his door'
  2. 'Serve hot and use chopped spring onion and thin slivers of ginger for garnish.'
  3. 'I am fully expecting to grill thin slivers of beetroot, again on a low heat, and fully intend to add grated horseradish to the salad dressing.'
  4. 'The lights of the city flying past dizzied me, the slivers of moonlight slicing through the trees and playing on the ground captivated me for as long as I could afford to be captivated.'
  5. 'Thin slivers of light streamed through the disjointed walls and glimmered through translucent containers, each capped and filled with a clear substance, lining several rows deep in the affixed shelving along one wall.'
  6. 'Shaving slivers of chocolate bars and cutting centred chocolates, we let each sample melt naturally on the tongue to explore its qualities after examining the appearance of each offering.'
  7. 'Hailey quickly dropped to the floor and picked up the shattered pieces, ignoring the thin slivers of glass which wedged in her fingers.'
  8. 'They came balanced on a bed of spinach and pasta dressed in a delicious creamy sauce with scallops, topped with thin slivers of crispy fried potato.'
  9. 'Thin rounds of sliced onions, finely chopped pieces of cabbage, diced cucumber and thin slivers of carrot, are just the right food to chew on, while waiting for the main course at a formal dinner.'
  10. 'She didn't bother opening the blinds or turning on the light, so it was pretty dark in her room with the exception of the tiny slivers of light that shone through the curtains and the small aperture between the two curtains.'
  11. 'As we watch, two thin slivers of cloud run together.'
A strip of loose untwisted textile fibres produced by carding.

    verb

    Cut or break (something) into small, thin, narrow pieces.
    1. 'A final work, Unravel, was a mainly white confection of foam-core strips, slivered paper plates and disassembled Chinese lanterns that descended from the ceiling in a vortex.'
    2. 'The lightly poached egg that arrives on top of terrific, seemingly creamless spaghetti carbonara leaks its unctuous yolk over strips of pancetta, slivered endive and parsley, and slick al dente noodles.'
    3. 'Add 1/8 teaspoon loosely packed saffron threads and 1 tablespoon slivered orange peel to vodka.'
    4. 'A lunch-time favorite is the shwarma sandwich, a pita-type of bread stuffed with slivered pieces of roasted lamb and seasoned with fresh green vegetables and a yogurt sauce.'
    5. 'Make many tiny slits in the fatty side of the roast and insert as much slivered garlic as you possibly can.'
    6. 'She had added slivered almonds and I knew she had thought of me as she prepared it: the rest of my cousins hated almonds; I was her favorite and she had added them just for me!'
    7. 'It begins with a hefty amount of thinly slivered onions, sautéed until lightly caramelized and then doused with a mixture of egg and heavy cream, poured into a tart shell, and baked to golden.'
    8. 'And the cake I made today was an almond-orange chocolate cake; I added slivered almonds in the cake, and served the slices with grand marnier-flavored clotted cream.'
    9. 'Super-dry jazz hi-hat work mixes with offhand synth-bass and slivered chirrups of sound sliced thin enough to be just impossible to place.'
    10. 'When their food finally came they were both delighted with a plate of dark steamed rice with raisins and slivered almonds, several strips of honey seasoned lamb, flat bread with butter and dried dates.'
    Convert (textile fibres) into slivers.
    1. 'Women from the Pattushali community have all the traditional items necessary for ginning (separating the cotton from seed), carding, slivering and spinning into fine yarn, some of which can be over 100 counts.'

    More definitions

    noun

    1. a small, slender, often sharp piece, as of wood or glass, split, broken, or cut off, usually lengthwise or with the grain; splinter.

    2. any small, narrow piece or portion: A sliver of sky was visible.

    3. a strand of loose, untwisted fibers produced in carding.

    verb (used with object)

    4. to split or cut off (a sliver) or to split or cut into slivers: to sliver a log into kindling.

    5. to form (textile fibers) into slivers.

    verb (used without object)

    6. to split.

    Origin

    (sliver)Late Middle English: from dialect slive ‘cleave’.