Adjective "Saturated" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈsatʃəreɪtɪd/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Holding as much water or moisture as can be absorbed; thoroughly soaked.
  1. 'Even after the surface flood water has receded, the soil may remain saturated for some time.'
  2. 'High volumes of very hot and dry air moving through shallow beds of grain result in the air leaving the grain mass much less saturated compared to deep-bed, in-bin drying systems.'
  3. 'Nearly level topography, where soil usually drains poorly, may also result in surface movement of materials by water when a saturated condition in the soil causes high runoff.'
  4. 'My lungs, dry like sandpaper from all the smoke, craved the saturated Washington air.'
  5. 'They should feel heavy and thoroughly saturated, but they should not be falling apart.'
  6. 'By the end of May the nearly saturated soil in the mountains could absorb little additional moisture.'
  7. 'Soon, almost incredibly, I saw three life-jacketed figures lift a thoroughly saturated tuxedo-wearing form onto the police boat.'
  8. 'Pollutants move with the water through the saturated soil only to travel into wells, streams, and ditches.'
  9. 'Seedlings planted in saturated soils or standing water will suffer from asphyxiation and probably die.'
  10. 'If you've used a pressure washer, the surface of the wood will be damp but not saturated, and should dry fairly quickly.'
  11. 'a saturated barium hydroxide solution'
  12. 'I held the saturated bisulfite solution at arms length and slowly added the sulfuric acid.'
  13. 'The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of accelerated aging of wheat seeds either over a saturated solution of sodium chloride or over water.'
  14. 'the glitzy, media-saturated plasticity of Los Angeles'
(of an organic molecule) containing the greatest possible number of hydrogen atoms, without carbon–carbon double or triple bonds.
  1. 'A new nomenclature system for the linear saturated hydrocarbons is proposed.'
  2. 'Most foods contain several different kinds of fat - including saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and trans fat - and some types are better for your health than others are.'
  3. 'A 4-ounce wedge of this creamy lemon pie provides 320 calories and 10 grams of fat (3.5 grams saturated).'
  4. 'Consumption of products such as soy milk also rose as consumers sought ways of reducing levels of saturated fat and cholesterol in their diets.'
(of colour) very bright, full, and free from an admixture of white.
  1. 'Brilliant saturated colours are allowed to interlock in these irregular, but organically shaped patches.'
  2. 'On closer inspection, their active, tactile surfaces, particularly in the earlier works, consists of a rich and broad range of saturated colours underscored by earth tones.'
  3. 'Clean, blip and fleck free pictures, well saturated colors, and a dash of light grain with a splash of digital edge enhancement make for a satisfactory overall presentation.'
  4. 'In 1962 Frankenthaler changed from oil to acrylic paint, which allowed her to achieve more richly saturated colour.'
  5. 'The saturated colours of the garments worn by the rather corpulent figures in de Hooch's painting suggest that this was one of his later works.'
  6. 'Still, there are brightly lit daylight scenes which show off more saturated color and natural skin tones.'
  7. 'Amir Mokri's cinematography is dominated by warm, deeply saturated hues, and loads of shadows.'
  8. 'The image is bright and crisp with fully saturated colours.'
  9. 'The saturated colours and grainy quality of the film evoke sticky, gritty skin and sweat; shot almost entirely on location, you can almost smell it.'
  10. 'The colours are heavily saturated: her red dress billows against a deep blue sky.'

Definitions

1. soaked, impregnated, or imbued thoroughly; charged thoroughly or completely; brought to a state of saturation.

2. (of colors) of maximum chroma or purity; of the highest intensity of hue; free from admixture of white.

3. Chemistry. (of a solution) containing the maximum amount of solute capable of being dissolved under given conditions. (of an organic compound) containing no double or triple bonds; having each single bond attached to an atom or group. (of an inorganic compound) h

More examples(as adjective)

"airs can be saturated with voices."

"solutions can be saturated as results."

"soils can be saturated with waters."

"soils can be saturated in areas."

"materials can be saturated by rainstorms."

More examples++