Adjective "Prevalent" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈprɛv(ə)l(ə)nt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Widespread in a particular area or at a particular time.
  1. 'Hip fractures are also more prevalent in areas with fluoridated water.'
  2. 'This is just another example of the insidious prying into peoples' lives that is so prevalent in our society today.'
  3. 'The racism our parent's faced in the past is far less prevalent today than it was decades ago.'
  4. 'Although the above only refers to the blogosphere, the same issues are prevalent in other areas of our lives too.'
  5. 'So where does it come from, who is responsible and why is it more prevalent today than at any time previously?'
  6. 'Which, some persons have been heard to observe, is why we have some of the social problems prevalent today.'
  7. 'When not targeting suspected burglars' homes, the squad patrols areas where thefts are prevalent.'
  8. 'Scraps of food and paper were evident in in the lane and a strong fishy odour was prevalent in the area.'
  9. 'It has two corollaries that challenge conceptions prevalent in some societies and ideologies.'
  10. 'Usually, caregiving is taken up as part of the informal set up of the family that is prevalent in society.'

Definitions

1. widespread; of wide extent or occurrence; in general use or acceptance.

2. having the superiority or ascendancy.

3. Archaic. effectual or efficacious.

More examples(as adjective)

"workings can be prevalent in occupations."

"infections can be prevalent in patients."

"infections can be prevalent in others."

"delays can be prevalent in places."

"crimes can be prevalent in districts."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin praevalent- ‘having greater power’, from the verb praevalere (see prevail).