Adjective "Plethora" definition and examples

(Plethora may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈplɛθ(ə)rə/

Definitions and examples

noun

A large or excessive amount of something.
  1. 'Allen won a plethora of medals during his illustrious career'
  2. 'This is a complicated, compelling book with countless strands that would provide fodder for a plethora of novels or histories.'
  3. 'Flicking through beauty magazines reveals a plethora of such deals, with money off a range of invasive surgical procedures.'
  4. 'If the indoor concerts are of lesser interest to the jazz devotee than in the past, the free shows offer a plethora of talent.'
  5. 'Travelers can choose from a plethora of different lodging options on a mountain vacation.'
  6. 'This CD has nothing but unexciting songs that could get lost and forgotten in a plethora of much better music.'
  7. 'A woman of today can be considered luckier as she has a plethora of designs to choose from, from casual wear to party wear.'
  8. 'Going through a major physical change can bring about a plethora of feelings.'
  9. 'This was hardly a thriller, but there was plentiful excitement due to a plethora of mistakes from both defences in the second half.'
  10. 'You can expect a plethora of them over the festive fortnight, and those with a taste for this kind of television must have been cheering last week.'
  11. 'Remuneration consultants like Chris Hart have a plethora of names.'
An excess of a bodily fluid, particularly blood.
  1. 'An anemia which developed despite continued blood transfusions in two dogs splenectomized during plethora has also been studied.'

More definitions

noun

1. overabundance; excess: a plethora of advice and a paucity of assistance.

2. Pathology Archaic. a morbid condition due to excess of red corpuscles in the blood or increase in the quantity of blood.

Origin

(plethora)Mid 16th century (in the medical sense): via late Latin from Greek plēthōrē, from plēthein ‘be full’.