Adjective "Petulant" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈpɛtjʊl(ə)nt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a person or their manner) childishly sulky or bad-tempered.
  1. 'a petulant shake of the head'
  2. 'He had his arms folded and was sneering like a petulant brat.'
  3. 'It's all because I am consumed by trying to make it work right away, like some petulant child.'
  4. 'After all, she is a teenage girl and they tend to be somewhat melodramatic, whiny and petulant.'
  5. 'Sometimes she reminds me of a petulant child holding its breath to get its way.'
  6. 'His reputation is that he's only interested in winning and that he's a petulant loser.'
  7. 'Mattie had come in like some petulant kid and thrown himself in a corner.'
  8. 'Though personally brave, he was petulant and totally lacking in judgement - a mere shooting star.'
  9. 'She's as assertive and capable as he is petulant and out of his element.'
  10. 'The film reveals him as a petulant child, given absolute authority!'
  11. 'Iaina pouted, resembling a petulant child instead of the full grown woman she was.'

Definitions

1. moved to or showing sudden, impatient irritation, especially over some trifling annoyance: a petulant toss of the head.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be petulant with people."

"people can be petulant."

"children can be petulant."

"behaviours can be petulant."

"fires can be petulant."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘immodest’): from French pétulant, from Latin petulant- ‘impudent’ (related to petere ‘aim at, seek’). The current sense (mid 18th century) is influenced by pettish.