Adjective "Penurious" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/pɪˈnjʊərɪəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Extremely poor; poverty-stricken.
  1. 'This, as you might appreciate, presents many problems for a man with the soul of a tortured and penurious poet.'
  2. 'Once some penurious student has finished loading up a piece of art into her van, it immediately gains in value.'
  3. 'He had grown up in a penurious middle-class family, and it was the middle class and the official world which predominated in his sketches, stories, and plays.'
  4. 'Your plan to spend everything you have and more as soon as possible seems a certain recipe for a penurious old age.'
  5. 'His poems continuously make us understand the penurious effects of genocide in communal riots.'
  6. 'A comparable case is that of Iraq, where in spite of the weekly strikes by the U.S. and Britain and the penurious condition of the country, has still not thrown in the towel.'
  7. 'Was the students' act bordering on something like savagery when they took advantage of the workers' penurious state?'
Unwilling to spend money; mean.
  1. 'It is rather penurious reasoning too, knowing what we know about the geo-strategic priorities of the United States at this conjuncture.'

Definitions

1. extremely stingy; parsimonious; miserly.

2. extremely poor; destitute; indigent.

3. poorly or inadequately supplied; lacking in means or resources.

More examples(as adjective)

"years can be penurious."

"workers can be penurious."

"wives can be penurious."

"scriveners can be penurious."

"rhymesters can be penurious."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: from medieval Latin penuriosus, from Latin penuria ‘need, scarcity’ (see penury).