Adjective "Many" definition and examples

(Many may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈmɛni/

Definitions and examples

adjective, determiner, & pronoun

A large number of.
  1. as pronoun 'the solution to many of our problems'
  2. as adjective 'one of my many errors'
  3. 'Over the past few weeks he has appeared in many of the smaller venues where he started out.'
  4. 'You may have weapons he seems to say, but we are still men and there are many of us.'
  5. 'Towneley is the largest of Burnley's many parks and is a jewel in the crown of the town.'
  6. 'There is a long way to go yet with these proposals, and possibly many changes to be made.'
  7. 'Over the years, many of those who used to be members have died or live in care homes.'
  8. 'Irrespective of that fact, the message of the time is that too many of us use the car too much.'
  9. 'At least two of them tend to accompany me on many of my journeys beyond these walls.'
  10. 'They say the measure of the man is in the number and quality of friends he keeps and John had many.'
  11. 'It is here that many people come as they prepare for their leap of faith across the border.'
  12. 'He is also an expert in solar technology and many of the bus stops will run on solar and wind power.'

noun

The majority of people.
  1. 'Troy depicts a war fought for the gain of the few and paid for in the blood and tears of the many.'
  2. 'This is an incredible case of where the needs of the many are trampled on for the needs of the one.'

More definitions

1. constituting or forming a large number; numerous: many people.

2. noting each one of a large number (usually followed by a or an): For many a day it rained. noun

3. a large or considerable number of persons or things: A good many of the beggars were blind.

4. the many, the greater part of humankind. pronoun

5. many persons or things: Many of the beggars were blind. Many were unable to attend.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be many."

"years can be many."

"countries can be many."

"investors can be many."

"companies can be many."

More examples++

Origin

Old English manig, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch menig and German manch.

Phrase

as many
a good (or great) many
have one too many
many a —
many's the —