Adjective "Jocular" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈdʒɒkjʊlə/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Fond of or characterized by joking; humorous or playful.
  1. 'his voice was jocular'
  2. 'In a jocular way he replied, Lucky you, and walked on.'
  3. 'The discussion was fast paced and jocular, with nearly all of the jokes at the expense of IMX's desperate competitors.'
  4. 'This incident encapsulated the nature of the jocular Scotsman's influential ministry.'
  5. 'July is one of the most popular jocund, jocose, and jocular months of the year.'
  6. 'You'll be splenetic and over-heated and I'll be jocular and whimsical.'
  7. 'Like previous national meetings, the NAS conference proceeded in a mostly serious, yet occasionally jocular mood.'
  8. 'They show no signs of mistreatment and even have a jocular relationship with the two guards.'
  9. 'Harmless jokes or jocular winking at the workplace can lead to activation of such guidelines.'
  10. 'Witty and polished, the film takes a jocular view of the characters and their failings but doesn't judge events.'
  11. 'In a jocular vein he speaks about the raw deal meted out to directors by certain half-baked specialists ‘who speak authoritatively’ about cinema.'

Definitions

1. given to, characterized by, intended for, or suited to joking or jesting; waggish; facetious: jocular remarks about opera stars.

More examples(as adjective)

"circumstances can be jocular in kitchens."

"people can be jocular with everybodies."

"circumstances can be jocular with smells."

"voices can be jocular."

"ways can be jocular."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century: from Latin jocularis, from joculus, diminutive of jocus (see joke).