Adjective "Irascible" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɪˈrasɪb(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or showing a tendency to be easily angered.
  1. 'In retirement, he has often provided the voice of an iconoclastic and irascible senior officer who has seen a lot - and who zealously guards his right to say what he thinks.'
  2. 'This concern, added to the French government's fear of enraging its notoriously irascible farmers, is the real motivation behind France's refusal to contemplate real reform of the agricultural organization.'
  3. 'The irascible judge is known for not allowing much to hold back his biting observations.'
  4. 'Two hours later they discovered the best bar in Faro was a barge docked on the banks of the town, where they parlayed for fuel and pinga with the irascible owner, Antonio.'
  5. 'The two make an odd couple both physically and emotionally - bulky, brooding, irascible Crowe contrasting with laid-back, long-limbed Bettany.'
  6. 'As the title suggests, the exhibition focuses on the five sea adventures Tintin embarked on with his companions: Snowy, the irascible Captain Haddock and the virtually deaf Professor Calculus.'
  7. 'He played the role for a decade and a half, delighting viewers with his portrayal of the irascible lawyer with references to wife Hilda as ‘she who must be obeyed’.'
  8. 'At the very same time, Teller was also seen as deeply irascible: thin-skinned, emotionally volatile, easily provoked, quick to take offense.'
  9. 'As a public spokesman for seismology and earthquake hazard mitigation, Richter often showed an irascible personality.'
  10. 'He was a famously difficult and irascible man, some might even have characterized as mad, but was unfailingly courteous, warm and hospitable towards me.'
  11. 'The irascible Jim Godbolt, a long-time friend of Ronnie Scott, ruffled a few feathers 20 years ago when he published his book on the early decades of British jazz.'
  12. 'You've got to admit, he's got longevity, a little patience there, even though he's a bit irascible after all these years.'
  13. 'Luc patiently visits his brother, uncomplainingly sticking by the bedside of this difficult and irascible man when everyone else deserts him.'
  14. 'Looking to her rearview mirror, she sees one solitary car behind her and is thankful that she must only contend with one irascible driver and no more.'
  15. 'I know that she is a poor widow, and that this innkeeper happens to be a very irascible person.'
  16. 'Because Papa grew so grouchy and irascible as his health failed, I wondered at times how many people really liked him.'
  17. 'In the TV show, Bruno pointed out to his irascible music teacher, Mr Sharofsky, that modern technology made traditional instruments redundant.'
  18. 'The books usually revolved around the exploits of a Northern family, the Brandons, and in particular the dour son of the family Carter and the irascible Uncle Mort.'
  19. 'But she wasn't laughing at Leo; she was amused with her own irascible mood.'
  20. 'Campbell, who's lived on the reservation since 1970, is a lifelong, irascible opponent of nuclear power in general, and the Prairie Island plant in particular.'

Definitions

1. easily provoked to anger; very irritable: an irascible old man.

2. characterized or produced by anger: an irascible response.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be irascible."

"ministers can be irascible."

"writers can be irascible."

"veneers can be irascible."

"traits can be irascible."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: via French from late Latin irascibilis, from Latin irasci ‘grow angry’, from ira ‘anger’.