Adjective "Insufficient" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɪnsəˈfɪʃ(ə)nt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Not enough; inadequate.
  1. 'In military terms, striking at insurgents and terrorists is necessary but insufficient.'
  2. 'He was charged with murder in 1997 but the case was dropped due to insufficient evidence.'
  3. 'So far there has been insufficient evidence to link financially any of the visits to a particular member.'
  4. 'That was arguably too prescriptive and pedagogic with insufficient human interest.'
  5. 'My offence, so far as I could tell, was to show insufficient respect to cabinet ministers.'
  6. 'I think the amount of police officers is insufficient, I think we need loads more.'
  7. 'However, that leaves insufficient time to organise live coverage for Saturday.'
  8. 'Tough laws are insufficient to find a solution to such a terrible scourge.'
  9. 'It strikes me as incredible that insufficient thought and planning was given to such a major activity.'
  10. 'The report found many examples of good work but said insufficient priority was being given to the issue.'

Definitions

1. not sufficient; lacking in what is necessary or required: an insufficient answer.

2. deficient in force, quality, or amount; inadequate: insufficient protection.

More examples(as adjective)

"reports can be insufficient for markets."

"rates can be insufficient in countries."

"volumes can be insufficient to demands."

"trainings can be insufficient at plants."

"tools can be insufficient in numbers."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘incapable, incompetent’): via Old French from late Latin insufficient- ‘not sufficing’, from in- ‘not’ + Latin sufficere (see suffice).