Adjective "Impulsive" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɪmˈpʌlsɪv/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Acting or done without forethought.
  1. 'he regretted his impulsive offer'
  2. 'Scientists have found that heavy smokers have less grey matter in their brains, which could make them more impulsive than non-smokers.'
  3. 'Unfortunately, this impulsive act led to a miserable marriage that ended in divorce.'
  4. 'His decisions are impulsive and driven by gut instinct - characteristics he doesn't abide in his staff.'
  5. 'Both were hasty, erratic, impulsive men and capable of atrocious judgment.'
  6. 'My weaknesses are that I'm impatient, impulsive and slightly stubborn.'
  7. 'I'm an impulsive person, and I have been known to write things I later regret.'
  8. 'She was entirely too impulsive, but that was one of the things he loved about her.'
  9. 'I saw someone who could be impulsive and crazy in a nice way.'
  10. 'Lynn once told me that I should be more impulsive.'
  11. 'Borderline personality disorder is characterized by mood instability and impulsive aggression.'
Acting as an impulse.
  1. 'An impulsive VHF event occurs, and the radiation from it arrives at a given remote station.'

Definitions

1. actuated or swayed by emotional or involuntary impulses: an impulsive child.

2. having the power or effect of impelling; characterized by impulsion: impulsive forces.

3. inciting to action: the impulsive effects of a revolutionary idea.

4. Mechanics. (of forces) acting momentarily; not continuous.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be impulsive in ages."

"media can be impulsive in things."

"finales can be impulsive in bravuras."

"waves can be impulsive."

"people can be impulsive."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘tending to impel’): from French impulsif, -ive or late Latin impulsivus, from Latin impuls- ‘driven onwards’ (see impulse). impulsive (sense 1) dates from the mid 18th century.