Adjective "Immodest" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɪˈmɒdɪst/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Lacking humility or decorousness.
  1. 'TV shows full of immodest language'
  2. 'Her act describes her rejection by strings of men for being too talkative and immodest, for her unwillingness to commit to caring for a potential husband's ailing mother, and, worst of all, for being a comedian.'
  3. 'This was a reaction to the growing diffusion of wigs which attracted attention, and were considered immodest or brazen in both communities.'
  4. 'Without sounding immodest, I have no trouble meeting men because I am quite regularly described as ‘a real looker’ and ‘easy on the eyes.’'
  5. 'There's an immodest bather, drunkards, a glutton (whose stomach does his talking for him), a fool, a woman, a monk, three choristers and a nun - all with a particular story to impart.'
  6. 'It seemed like an immodest thing to admit, but I thought, ‘Maybe he's right.’'
  7. 'At the same time without being immodest, I would say we are the original reformers and nobody can take that away from us.'
  8. 'This is a particularly noticeable thing about baboons, or perhaps it is what humans cannot avoid noticing - being so well trained to look down upon such immodest displays.'
  9. 'Mine is an immodest, but by no means facetious, proposal.'
  10. 'The answer must be that this is a dress not seen as ‘Western’ or immodest, and yet a dress that allows one to go to school or college, and to participate in the work force.'
  11. '‘At the risk of sounding immodest, I know that any history of Tamil cinema will be incomplete without at least a few chapters on my work,’ he asserts.'

Definitions

1. not modest in conduct, utterance, etc.; indecent; shameless.

2. not modest in assertion or pretension; forward; impudent.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be immodest as people."

"people can be immodest."

"ideas can be immodest."

"rallies can be immodest."

"publicists can be immodest."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: from French immodeste or Latin immodestus, from in- ‘not’ + modestus (see modest).