Adjective "Flock" definition and examples

(Flock may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/flɒk/

Definitions and examples

noun

A number of birds of one kind feeding, resting, or travelling together.
  1. 'A flock of four birds is the most common size in Parus during winter.'
  2. 'Thin clouds floated in the sky, and I could see a flock of birds passing by the clouds on a formation.'
  3. 'Members of bird flocks and fish shoals check for predators less often and spend less time hiding in shelters than do solitary individuals.'
  4. 'For most of us, a more familiar example is a flock of birds, all moving together as if under the direction of a leader or some central command.'
  5. 'A flock of birds took flight, startled by his voice.'
  6. 'After the trials, we put colored bands back on males and returned the birds to their flocks to maintain a standardized social setting for all other males prior to their trials.'
  7. 'A flock of birds surges impetuously from the thickets and takes flight towards the windmills that decorate the landscape.'
  8. 'Unfortunately, these birds fed in large flocks on fruit and other crops, and were shot in huge numbers by farmers.'
  9. 'Possible Landscape begins with piercing tones that ring together like a flock of synthetic birds, each tuned to a single, unwavering note.'
  10. 'A flock of birds off in the distance scattered away.'
  11. 'a flock of sheep'
  12. 'Their herds of cattle and flocks of sheep from New South Wales were eagerly bought by the early South Australian settlers.'
  13. 'They have a smallholding in Devon which is home to a host of animals, including a flock of pedigree Black Welsh Mountain sheep.'
  14. 'The group halted their horses at the gate as a flock of sheep went ambling past.'
  15. 'The area around Hawes and Leyburn became a temporary home to teams of men dedicated to culling whole cattle herds and sheep flocks.'
  16. 'If you are lucky enough to have a grassy paddock, it's worth the effort to get a couple of horses or a flock of sheep standing in just the right place.'
  17. 'A local woman saw the animal, which she described as about five times the size of a domestic cat, among a flock of sheep.'
  18. 'In normal times, the Moores work the farm in two separate units, producing winter oats and winter wheat as well as fattening 600 head of cattle and a flock of store sheep.'
  19. 'When they beached the ships, they saw flocks of sheep and goats and they killed them for feasting.'
  20. 'The farm has a flock of 85 sheep but there are plans to build up the numbers by keeping some of the ewe lambs for breeding stock this year.'
  21. 'There were a few camels and traditional black Bedouin tents here and there with large flocks of sheep and goats nearby.'
  22. 'She looked out and saw a flock of men crowded around the stage.'
  23. 'One year as she'd stepped off the plane to Cyprus, a whole flock of people had gathered around her.'
  24. 'I noticed a crowd was gathering, a flock of women in huddles whispering to each other on the outskirts of the crowd.'
  25. 'Still, the flock of visitors, not just the Kuta crowd with its uniform of tie-dyes and beads, keeps coming back.'
  26. 'Thomas addressed his flock'
  27. '‘We must become mature in this adult faith, we must guide the flock of Christ to this faith,’ he said.'
  28. 'I could surrender everything to the Lord - my dear wife and children, my congregation as a dear flock, the seminary and its staff.'
  29. 'There is a review of the failures of Judah's leadership and the promise that God himself will take charge of the flock through the appointment of one to rule like David.'
  30. 'This attribution is based on the similarities between the depiction of Christ and his flock and other designs that have been documented to Wilson.'
  31. 'There were many times when I envied the moral clarity of those priests as they tended their flocks of young believers, incessantly preaching the demands of sexual purity.'
  32. 'He was made a bishop in 1677 and sent to Germany to minister to a small flock of Catholics.'
  33. 'He should stick to ministering his own flock and keep his opinions to his pulpit and not to the public.'
  34. 'What is the shape of ministry when the wolf is near your flock?'
  35. 'But that's not going to happen - even in this enlightened age, when groovy archbishops invite their flocks to regard the Resurrection through sceptical eyes.'
  36. 'Fear of litigation, an admittedly necessary concern, trumped a bishop's duty to his priests and to his flock.'

verb

(of birds) congregate in a flock.
  1. 'A cloud of birds flocks into the air, signifying the approach of someone or something.'
  2. 'Think about what you would like to look at out here: tulips, wisteria, song birds flocking to a birdbath?'
  3. 'The theory is that, if enough birds flock, the B - 52s will be unable to fly because of the risk of strikes to their engines.'
  4. 'At the moment the birds are beginning to flock, so it is a lucrative time to do it.'
  5. 'At certain times of the day, small birds flock to these branches, chattering and fluttering, as if this were a festive occasion.'
  6. 'Golden-crowned Kinglets are fairly easy to see during the winter when they flock with other small birds and can occur in large numbers.'
  7. 'Several species of birds flock to gather the fruit.'
  8. 'They said that the increased numbers of birds which flocked around the pigs increased the risk of them flying into the engines of aircraft.'
  9. 'An early and simple model was designed to explain how birds flock.'
  10. 'Birds flocked on the skies and flew around the Schelewig mansion in the new Lake Town.'
  11. 'tourists flock to Oxford in their thousands'
  12. 'They flocked around him, all wanting to get a better view, all the time.'
  13. 'After many years in the doldrums, cinema groups are reporting a massive increase in takings, as crowds flock back to the big screen.'
  14. 'But the way I see it, too many people are flocking here for benefits.'
  15. 'As glorious Tramore yet again defied the dismal weather forecasts the fans flocked to the seaside venue.'
  16. 'Low paid workers, especially in schools, have flocked to join unions.'
  17. 'They found a shop was selling them for £10 and teenagers were flocking to buy them.'
  18. 'Employers will flock to hipper cities to attract this young labor force.'
  19. 'Instead, the jobless are flocking in ever-greater numbers across the border.'
  20. 'Soccer fans flock in their numbers to these confrontations and expect nothing less than yet another soccer spectacle.'
  21. 'However it will be some time before crowds flock back to the matches.'

noun

A soft material for stuffing cushions, quilts, and other soft furnishings, made of wool refuse or torn-up cloth.
  1. 'However, it is clear that asbestos flock falls within that definition.'
  2. 'All excess flock fibers are automatically collected and recycled back to the dispensing hopper.'
  3. 'Those results are consistent with Schillaci's findings and support our flock composition results.'
  4. 'The hall was decorated in green flock paper, and was furnished with a modern two layer bronze and teak tripod table.'

More definitions

noun

1. a number of animals of one kind, especially sheep, goats, or birds, that keep or feed together or are herded together.

2. a large number of people; crowd.

3. a large group of things: a flock of letters to answer.

4. the Christian church in relation to Christ. a single congregation in relation to its pastor.

5. Archaic. a band or company of persons.

verb (used without object)

6. to gather or go in a flock or crowd: They flocked around the football hero.

Origin

(flock)Middle English: from Old French floc, from Latin floccus (see floccus).