Adjective "Encrusted" definition and examples

(Encrusted may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ɪnˈkrʌst//ɛnˈkrʌst/

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Definitions and examples

verb

Cover or decorate (something) with a hard surface layer.
  1. 'the dried and encrusted blood'
  2. 'This is probably the most colourful zone of our inshore waters and rocks are often a warm, pinkish-purple colour, thanks to encrusting algae.'
  3. 'A shoal of silvery pollack hurried away above some huge boulders covered in brilliant pink and red encrusting algae.'
  4. 'There is a good covering of marine life, and many rocks are encrusted by a hard pink growth.'
  5. 'They are covered in encrusting life and soft corals and often surrounded by big pollack and schooling fish.'
  6. 'Salt crystals encrust your shoes and coat your pants cuffs, and you begin to think your own cells are turning to salt.'
  7. 'Once it takes hold it encrusts boat hulls and propellers, and chokes pipes and aquaculture.'
  8. 'That gritty feeling in my eyes, as if the lids were encrusted with sand; it would pass.'
  9. 'Steep sloping walls and cascading waterfalls of coral encrusted the features like a blanket of molten lava.'
  10. 'Outcrops of these green sandstone ledges are so encrusted with fossil oysters that they look like rubble from ancient middens.'
  11. 'The corners of his mouth were still encrusted with chocolate from his cookies.'

More definitions

1. incrust. verb (used with or without object)

More examples(as adjective)

"wheels can be encrusted with people."

"tyreses can be encrusted with people."

"ships can be encrusted with shelters."

"ships can be encrusted with lives."

"ships can be encrusted with foods."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense ‘cause to form a crust’): from French incruster or encroûter, both from Latin incrustare, from in- ‘into’ + crusta ‘a crust’.