Adjective "Dowdy" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈdaʊdi/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a person or their clothes) unfashionable and unstylish in appearance (typically used of a woman)
  1. 'I found it hard to believe that I had ever located anything attractive in this dowdy woman with her bleached blonde hair, her nonexistent figure and her masculine voice.'
  2. 'Far from being a dowdy matron, she was a strong-willed, independent-minded, intelligent woman, twice married, with a mischievous sense of humour.'
  3. 'Denise was last seen on our screens playing the dowdy mother of six, Edie McClure, in Born & Bred.'
  4. 'On the cover of Time, in a spread in Life, the image of Romania's Iron Lady was stout and unsmiling, a monolith with a face of stone, dowdy clothes and unkempt hair.'
  5. 'She writes a weekly series called The Beseleys for a nameless and dowdy woman's magazine of the sort Dewar helped to fill when she was a jobbing journalist.'
  6. 'His hands, which he'd put lightly on his wife's shoulders to persuade her to go home, felt something very irregular underneath that sensible, dowdy dress.'
  7. 'Gone is the willowy beauty, and in her place is a thin, pinched, dowdy lady, an eccentric Victorian who wears ugly hats.'
  8. 'Now the road to the grave stretches ahead, enlivened only by daytime television and the holidays he will take with an equally dowdy wife he barely tolerates.'
  9. 'By the end of Ann's episode, the formerly dowdy Jersey girl is certainly more stylish.'
  10. 'Television pundits lambasted her image as a frumpy housewife who delivered dull speeches while clad in dowdy grey or brown suits.'

Definitions

adjective, dowdier, dowdiest.

1. not stylish; drab; old-fashioned: Why do you always wear those dowdy old dresses?

2. not neat or tidy; shabby.

noun, plural dowdies.

3. a dowdy woman.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be dowdy."

"images can be dowdy."

"stores can be dowdy."

"dresses can be dowdy."

"clothes can be dowdy."

More examples++

Origin

(dowdy)Late 16th century (as a noun): from dowd.