Adjective "Distrustful" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/dɪsˈtrʌstf(ə)l//dɪsˈtrʌstfʊl/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Feeling or showing distrust of someone or something.
  1. 'I'm distrustful of all these men who buy magazines about health and fashion.'
  2. 'On the other hand, I'm automatically distrustful of any group of ruling parties that decides to ban another party.'
  3. 'But people in the Black Isle are distrustful of government scientific advice and remain unconvinced.'
  4. 'It is not in borrowers' interests for them to become worried and distrustful of their lender.'
  5. 'The doctors are probably also now distrustful of the BMA.'
  6. 'He was incredibly distrustful of the wily-looking fox, and was very interested to hear his story - if ever he got the chance to.'
  7. 'Licinius became increasingly distrustful of him and suspicious of his own Christian subjects, whom he began to persecute.'
  8. 'Most Scots, they say, are distrustful of the nuclear industry and would prefer to tackle climate change through windmills, tidal and solar power, and recycling.'
  9. 'Even people who are normally, and understandably, distrustful of cops should put their survival first.'
  10. 'Johnson smirked in a manner that's typical of a player who's cynical and distrustful of a new head coach.'

Definitions

1. unable or unwilling to trust; doubtful; suspicious: An alert scientist is distrustful of coincidences.

More examples(as adjective)

"voters can be distrustful of presidents."

"socialists can be distrustful of parties."

"people can be distrustful of people."

"wests can be distrustful of advocacies."

"valuableands can be distrustful of rules."

More examples++