Adjective "Cantankerous" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/kanˈtaŋk(ə)rəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Bad-tempered, argumentative, and uncooperative.
  1. 'He was always known as Captain Jessie, a cantankerous old duffer nearing his eightieth year.'
  2. 'His cantankerous old mother and frustrated spinster sister are a constant drain on his increasingly shaky resources.'
  3. 'This isn't like the cantankerous old Johnboy we've come to know and loathe, and frankly I find this a bit disturbing, but a welcome change.'
  4. 'Now we have responsibility for my 88 year old cantankerous maiden aunt who suffers from moderately severe dementia and resides in a rest home.'
  5. 'He can be overbearing, cantankerous and obnoxious at times.'
  6. 'To anybody that could read no deeper than the physical, he was just as grumpy and cantankerous as always.'
  7. 'He's a cantankerous old man, set in his ways and prone to sulking to get what he wants.'
  8. 'And you dare not write off people who pen moaning letters to parish newsletters or local papers as cantankerous curmudgeons.'
  9. 'Later, though, Sammy became more cantankerous.'
  10. 'The cantankerous old lady she had worked for for six years had been good to her, in her gruff way.'

Definitions

1. disagreeable to deal with; contentious; peevish: a cantankerous, argumentative man.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be cantankerous to feuds."

"chiefs can be cantankerous in/at/on days."

"people can be cantankerous."

"chiefs can be cantankerous."

"ways can be cantankerous."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 18th century: of unknown origin; perhaps a blend of Anglo-Irish cant ‘auction’ and rancorous (see rancour).