Adjective "Boiled" definition and examples

(Boiled may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/bɔɪl/

Definitions and examples

verb

(with reference to a liquid) reach or cause to reach the temperature at which it bubbles and turns to vapour.
  1. no object 'he waited for the water to boil'
  2. 'Remove the chicken and boil the juices furiously for a minute or two.'
  3. 'The fist thing they do every day is to boil water and cook rice after they wake up early in the morning.'
  4. 'I boiled the water, cooked the noodles and then added the cheese sauce.'
  5. 'When they are cooked, lift them out and boil the liquid until thick and reduced.'
  6. 'The little hotplate was an added bonus, keeping the coffee good and hot without ever boiling it.'
  7. 'Water should always be boiled before drinking.'
  8. 'Health experts have advised all water should be boiled before drinking until the source of the contamination is traced.'
  9. 'The first paddle steamers typically used oil-fired boilers, which provided heat to boil water, which generated steam to power the boat.'
  10. 'Now add a cup of double cream and heat without boiling it.'
  11. 'I had to boil up the water in an old kettle with a frayed wire.'
  12. no object 'the kettle boiled and he filled the teapot'
  13. 'Martine didn't own a kettle so a pan of water had to be boiled, I knew that if Helene needed a cup of coffee it was best to let her get on with it.'
  14. 'When the kettle had been boiled and the tea had been made we all went up to Terri's bedroom.'
  15. 'She boiled the kettle again and made a cup of tea with slightly sour milk.'
(with reference to food) cook or be cooked by immersing in boiling water or stock.
  1. 'two boiled eggs'
  2. 'British travellers can fall victim to the disease if they do not boil food and water before consumption.'
  3. 'But it wasn't until nearly 300 years later that Arab traders began to boil or roast these precious beans.'
  4. 'Do you think there's a whole ward somewhere in the bowels of the building where they spend long hours doing nothing but boiling cabbage?'
  5. 'Instead, they found it was healthier to boil food in water or a light stock.'
  6. 'You prepare black beans very much the same way you would other dried peas, but you've got to soak them for a couple of hours before boiling them.'
  7. 'Chicken and bamboo shoots had been boiled together with green curry, tasting spicy but not fiery.'
  8. 'That evening I filled out my menu card for the next day, requesting just boiled vegetables for lunch.'
  9. 'Fish is boiled or grilled over open fires and eaten by hand.'
  10. 'It is the only bread product that is boiled before it is baked.'
  11. 'In addition, wherever eggs have been boiled for the recipes above, then they need to be peeled before moving on to the next stage of the recipe.'
  12. 'boil bedclothes and towels'
  13. 'If you are not satisfied that this washing powder boils your clothes whiter than any other washing product return the unused portion of the first packet you buy to us and we will send you double its purchase price.'
  14. 'Beryl rounded up all our jumpers and various moth-eaten Fair Isle handknits belonging to Reginald, and boiled them in her washing machine.'
  15. 'You can also sterilise equipment by boiling it in water for at least 10 minutes.'
  16. 'Initially, these gloves were sterilized by boiling and then put on the wearer's wet hands.'
  17. 'one valet was ordered to be boiled alive'
  18. 'She was boiled alive in a cauldron of boiling water.'
  19. 'I am going to boil him in hot oil!'
(of the sea or clouds) be turbulent and stormy.
  1. 'But something was stirring in the clouds that obscured the fine blue of the sky, making them boil and seethe.'
  2. 'As you'll also know, the quake was bad, but the sea didn't boil like last time.'
  3. 'Picture a spot where, at the change of tides, the sea boils through a narrow pass, providing experienced divers with a glorious ride past sharks and other marine life.'
  4. 'I stood on the front porch watching horizontal sheets of rain sweep up the driveway as the clouds boiled menacingly overhead.'
  5. 'The sea boiled and on every side ships were stripped of their superstructure by the wave that hit the shoreline a split-second later.'
  6. 'It should be dark and overcast, lightning and thunder boiling across the sky, like his insides were doing at that moment.'
  7. 'Just before the whales break the surface, the sea boils vigorously and a perfect circle of clear water opens up above them.'
  8. 'The sea was boiling, it seemed, over an area no bigger than a mini-roundabout.'
  9. 'Clouds boiled in the sky overhead, blocking out the sun and heralding a storm.'
  10. 'Her blond hair was being whipped by the wind, behind her black clouds boiled and lightning flashed, or so it seemed to George and the woman.'
  11. 'he was boiling with rage'
  12. 'Lia could feel the anger begin to boil within her chest.'
  13. 'The rage was boiling up so quickly that I was afraid I'd throw this man out of the kitchen window.'
  14. 'A tinge of anger began to boil, but she diverted her gaze away from the soldiers to calm herself.'
  15. 'There was no response and worry started to boil up inside her.'
  16. 'He begins to boil, his anger lashing out more than ever before.'
  17. 'He felt all of his anger of the past weeks boil up.'
  18. 'I was still boiling with jealousy, but I knew I shouldn't have said what I'd said to Adrian.'
  19. 'Frustration is boiling up, and she is responsible for it and so she is passing the blame.'
  20. 'I am starting to boil up with anger, and so I try with all my might to get free of the ropes.'
  21. 'I was boiling with anger and shouted that his behaviour was way out of line.'

noun

The temperature at which a liquid bubbles and turns to vapour.
  1. 'The water came to a boil and Rowena poured some over her teabag.'
  2. 'Cover with the lid and lower the heat setting to maintain a gentle boil.'
  3. 'In a medium saucepan, bring two inches of water to a boil and remove from the heat.'
  4. 'Bring to a boil, and stir all the time until it's thickened.'
  5. 'To peel your own almonds, bring a small saucepan of water to a boil.'
  6. 'Add the lentils, broth, tomatoes and tomato paste to the pot and bring to a boil.'
  7. 'Bring to the boil, then turn down and simmer half-covered for 20-25 minutes.'
  8. 'Once the porridge has returned to the boil, it should be allowed to cook slowly for 20-30 minutes.'
  9. 'Bring slowly to the boil, skimming off the froth that rises to the surface.'
  10. 'Bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer for three hours.'
  11. 'Put the sweet potatoes in a large saucepan, cover them with water and bring to a boil.'
  12. 'Heat the milk and water together with the garlic clove and the bay leaf, then bring to the boil and add the fish.'
  13. 'She was a very welcoming person and always had the kettle on the boil.'
  14. 'Once again the kettle will be on the boil and the ladies committee will look after the guests.'
  15. 'She loved people to call, and the welcome was always there, because the kettle was always on the boil, and her face would light up when she would come to the door.'
  16. 'They kept the kettle on the boil all day.'
  17. 'The kettle is permanently on the boil.'
  18. 'The charity hopes to have every kettle in the county on the boil this May for their annual fundraising Tea Day.'
  19. 'The second, hotter, hob was opened and pasta was put on the boil.'
  20. 'The elderly widower keeps the food on the boil all afternoon long, stirring it now and then.'
  21. 'he has gone off the boil since opening the campaign'
  22. 'He has gone off the boil lately.'
  23. 'They are desperate for the victory having gone off the boil in recent weeks.'
  24. 'It seems that I've gone off the boil, which makes me less hot-headed.'
  25. 'The issue has gone off the boil in recent times.'
  26. 'Even if their records have gone off the boil, the band has its reputation as one of Britain's most exciting live experiences to protect.'
  27. 'Since then the issue has gone off the boil.'
  28. 'This game's gone off the boil a bit since the sending off.'
  29. 'It has gone off the boil this year, but Dampier still backs it for consistent returns.'
  30. 'Things have gone off the boil a bit recently.'
  31. 'But things had gone off the boil at Burnden and Alan Ball's Exeter made an already subdued crowd of 5,631 even quieter.'
  32. 'Two quick twelve inch pulls then a huge head appeared quickly engulfing the frog, this was followed by a big boil and swirl.'
  33. 'A boil or two on the surface, and the fish, a stunningly beautiful creature of around 7 lbs. was scooped into the net.'
  34. 'No one has seen the bite, and there is no boil or splash to mark the event, just 130 lb Moimoi stretching out straight down the wake, a reel screaming.'

noun

An inflamed pus-filled swelling on the skin, caused typically by the infection of a hair follicle.
  1. 'Lemon oil taken internally or sniffed, is good for diabetes, asthma, boils and varicose veins.'
  2. 'A boil should be treated by applying a warm-water compress to the affected area for 20 minutes, three times a day, until it bursts.'
  3. 'The Los Angeles Times reported January 27 that the skin infections, which appear as ugly boils, started turning up last fall.'
  4. 'Symptoms of diabetes include having to get up at night to go to the toilet, feeling thirsty, lacking energy and getting reoccurring infections such as boils and abscesses.'
  5. 'You can use them to treat sores, bruises, cuts, boils and inflammatory skin conditions.'
  6. 'In the story, Job hangs on true, and God gives him his wives and children and fixes all his boils and carbuncles.'
  7. 'They also suffered from boils and abscesses as a result of a lack of fresh food, diarrhoea, mosquito attacks and constant loss of sleep.'
  8. 'A boil is an abscess occurring in the skin, and is associated with hair follicles.'
  9. 'It is useful for boils and skin ulcerations, like bedsores and canker sores.'
  10. 'The ripe fruit was used to provide external relief from carbuncles and painful boils and used internally to treat stomach ulcers.'

More definitions

1. drunk.

More examples(as adjective)

"eggs can be boiled."

"rices can be boiled."

"potatoes can be boiled."

"sweets can be boiled."

"waters can be boiled."

More examples++

Origin

Old English bȳle, bȳl, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch buil and German Beule.

Phrase

boil down to
boil something down
boil over